Dr. Oz accused of making false statements about Olive Oil

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NAOOA is seeking actual, consequential, and punitive damages from Dr Oz and the companies behind his talk show

By Kelly Mclaughlin For Dailymail.com

Dr Oz has been accused to lying to his audience and making a series of false statements about the quality of olive oil on his talk show to promote the sale of California olive oils and prevent the sale of the product from elsewhere in the United States and across the world.

The North American Olive Oil Association (NAOOA) claims that in an episode from May, Dr Oz and guest ‘certified oleologist’ Maia Hirschbein ‘made a series of disparaging statements that caused harm’ to the organization, according to court documents obtained by DailyMail.com.

NAOOA says in the lawsuit – in which it demands Dr Oz pay damages for spreading false statements about olive oil – that much of what the talk show host and his guest said was ‘not based on reasonable or reliable scientific inquiry, facts, or data’.

The North American Olive Oil Association (NAOOA) slapped Dr Oz and the companies behind his talk show with a lawsuit claiming he and a guest made false statements about olive oil on his show.

NAOOA claims that Dr Oz and guest ‘certified oleologist’ Maia Hirschbein ‘made a series of disparaging statements’ about olive oil in a May episode, in which they discussed olive oils and the dangers of buying fake olive oil.

The association works to promote olive oil consumption in the United States, conducts testing on retail and foodservice olive oils, and offers a certified quality seal program for oils that meet global trade standards for quality and purity.

In the episode mentioned in the suit, which aired May 12, 2016, Dr Oz and Hirschbein discussed olive oils and the dangers of buying fake extra virgin olive oil.

Hirschbein, according to court documents, is employed by a privately owned company in California that sells olive oils.

‘As no point in the show did any person disclose Ms. Hirschbein’s vested interest in denigrating olive oils originating outside of California or her vested interest in promoting California oils,’ documents say.

In the episode, Dr Oz makes several statements about olive oils, even suggesting that as much as 80 per cent of supermarket extra virgin olive oils could be fake.

In the episode Dr Oz claims that as much as 80 per cent of supermarket extra virgin olive oils could be fake.

He also suggested that fake extra virgin olive oil is a widespread problem, according to court documents.

The host described how it is made by mixing different ingredients and said that companies would ‘slap a little label on there saying ‘packed in Italy’ and then you ship it to US supermarkets’.

NAOOA is seeking actual, consequential, and punitive damages from Dr Oz and the companies behind his talk show

NAOOA is seeking actual, consequential, and punitive damages from Dr Oz and the companies behind his talk show

NAOOA, however, says that Dr Oz’s statements were false.

‘The Doctor Oz Show willfully and maliciously disseminated to the public the above-alleged false information about olive oil coming from places other than California,’ court documents say.

The association says that the host’s comments caused it to suffer ‘actual and consequential damages that will be proven at trial’.

‘The statements made on The Doctor Oz Show were designed to promote California olive oils and to prevent viewers from buying olive oils produced elsewhere in the United States and imported olive oils, including those that are certified by the Quality Seal Program,’ NAOOA adds in legal documents.

The organization said that because of the Dr Oz episode, its ‘creditworthiness and basic integrity were impugned’.

Hirschbein, according to court documents, is employed by a privately owned company in California that sells olive oils, but this fact is not disclosed on the show.

It added that the statements said on the show harmed its ‘reputation, its ability to conduct its work, and its relationship with present and prospective consumers’.

The Doctor Oz Show has a ‘well-documented history’ of promoting products backed by ‘questionable science’, NAOOA says, adding that the show has been called into question by reputable news outlets, medical journals, and US government officials.

NAOOA also suggests that the ‘Oz Effect’ phenomenon caused further damage to their company, because viewers make purchases based on products mentioned on the show.

The association is suing Dr Oz, Entertainment Media Ventures and Zoco Productions for the damage allegedly done.

NAOOA is seeking actual, consequential, and punitive damages from Dr Oz and the companies behind his talk show.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3988050/Dr-Oz-accused-maliciously-spreading-false-information-using-questionable-science-promote-California-olive-oil.html#ixzz4S6bs1XnN
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Enjoy the season-Acorn squash with pumpkin seeds and walnuts served with roasted pork tenderloin

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By Myra Starkey at www.victoriaadvocate.com

ROASTED PORK TENDERLOIN

• 1 tsp. sea salt, or to taste

• 1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

• 1/4 cup balsamic dressing

• 2 Tbsp. olive oil

• 1/2 cup maple syrup

• 1 cup cranberries

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Trim tenderloin of fat and any silver skin and pat dry with a paper towel. Pierce pork loin all over with a fork and put in a Ziploc bag with the dressing. Allow to sit overnight. Heat olive oil over medium-high heat in a large oven-safe pan (cast iron or a dutch oven will work). Once oil is hot, add pork and brown on all sides (6 minutes total). The outside of the pork will be browned, but the inside will appear to be raw. Place in the oven on a baking sheet covered with foil. Place cranberries on baking sheet and drizzle both pork and cranberries with 1/4 cup maple syrup. Bake uncovered in preheated oven for 15 minutes, flipping the tenderloin over halfway through baking. Toss cranberries so they roast evenly.

Bake until center of pork registers at least 150 degrees then, transfer to a cutting board and let meat rest 5-10 minutes Pour remaining 1/4 cup syrup over tenderloin if you are serving then. If you are serving later, reserve ¼ cup and heat before pouring over tenderloin. Pour berries over tenderloin. Additional syrup can be used to add sweetness.

ACORN SQUASH WITH Pumpkin seeds, walnuts and dates

• 2 acorn squash

• 1-2 Tbsp. olive oil

• 1/2 tsp. salt

• 1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper

• 1/4 cup brown sugar

• 4 Tbsp. butter

• 1/4 cup walnuts, coarsely chopped

• 1/4 cup pumpkin seeds

• 1/4 cup chopped dates

• 1/4 cup dried cranberries (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cut the squash in half. Be careful as the skin is tough.

Remove all the seeds and discard. Carefully cut each half into a wedge.

Place the wedges into a large baking dish then drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, pepper and brown sugar.

Bake the squash in the oven for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until soft and caramelized around the edges. Remove the squash from the oven. In a small saucepan over medium heat add the butter, walnuts, pumpkin seeds and chopped dates, cook until the butter melts. Spoon over the squash and serve.

 

 

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FARRO SALAD WITH PAN ROASTED CARROTS

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From The Chew at ABC.com

ingredients

  • 1/2 pound  carrots (peeled, cut into 2-inch pieces on a bias)
  • 2 tablespoons  olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon  freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon  ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon  chipotle powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon  ground ginger
  • 3 cups  water or stock
  • 1 cup  farro
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper (to taste)

SHERRY VINAIGRETTE:

  • 4 tablespoons  sherry vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon  honey
  • 2 teaspoons  Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 cup  olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper (to taste)

TO ASSEMBLE:

  • 1/2 cup  pistachios (toasted, roughly chopped)
  • 1/2 cup  parsley (roughly chopped)
  • 2/3 cup  feta (crumbled)

step-by-step directions

  • Preheat oven to 400ºF.
  • In a large bowl, add the carrots and drizzle with the olive oil. Add the nutmeg, cinnamon, chipotle powder, and ginger, and toss to combine. Season with salt and pepper. Spread the carrots on a baking sheet and place in the oven until golden and cooked through, about 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside.
  • In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, add the water and farro and bring to a boil. Season with salt and pepper. Reduce the heat to low and cover. Cook until tender but chewy, about 10 minutes. Drain any remaining liquid and set aside to cool.
  • For the Sherry Vinaigrette: In a mason jar, add the sherry vinegar, honey, Dijon mustard, and olive oil and shake to combine. Season with salt and pepper.
  • To Assemble: To a large bowl, add the farro, carrots, pistachios, parsley and feta. Drizzle with sherry vinaigrette and toss to combine.
  • Tip: To toast the nuts, place them in a dry saute pan over low heat and toast until golden and aromatic, about 5 minutes. Remove and allow to cool.
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Mediterranean diet may lower the risk of peripheral artery disease: Study

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By:  Dr. Victor Marchione   at  www.belmarrahealth.com

The Mediterranean diet may lower the risk of peripheral artery disease, according to research findings. The Mediterranean diet is characterized by a high consumption of fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, fish, healthy oils like olive oil, minimal sugar, and a glass of red wine. The Mediterranean diet has been extensively studied and has been shown to improve heart and brain function.

The study included 7,477 participants all without PAD at the start of the study. The participants did have type 2 diabetes and at least three other cardiovascular risk factors. The participants either received a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts, or counseling on a low-fat diet (control group). All participants completed a comprehensive dietary educational program on a quarterly basis.

There were 89 confirmed cases of PAD at the mid-point follow-up. Mediterranean diet was associated with a reduced risk of PAD.

The authors wrote in conclusion, “To our knowledge, this is the first randomized primary prevention trial to suggest an association between a dietary intervention and [reduction in] PAD. These results are consistent with previous observational studies and relevant from a public health perspective.”

Posted in Health, news, Uncategorized Tagged with: , , ,

Fall Spice Pumpkin Soup

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by Juliana Goodwin at BaxterBulletin.com

1 baking pumpkin (opt for one of the larger ones)

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 small red onion

1 yellow bell pepper

Salt

3 cups chicken stock

1 teaspoon olive oil   (+ more LYKOVOUNO to drizzle on top)

½ teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon cumin seed

½ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cut the stem off the baking pumpkin (make sure you use a baking pumpkin, not ones you carve) and then cut the pumpkin into six pieces. Remove all the seeds and save for another use. Cut the bell pepper in half and remove the seeds. Cut the red onion in half and remove the skin. Place all the vegetables on a baking dish or broiler pan.

Drizzle olive oil and salt over all the vegetables. Bake for 40 minutes and then remove the bell pepper with tongs. Continue to bake the pumpkin and onion for 20-25 minutes, until fork tender. Allow them to cool for 15 minutes before handling.

When cool enough to handle, use a spoon to scrape the pumpkin out of its shell. Set aside.

In a pot, heat 1 teaspoon olive oil. Add the cumin and pumpkin pie spice and cook 1-2 minutes until fragrant, but do not let them burn.

Place the pumpkin, bell pepper and onion in the blender (do this in two batches) and add chicken broth (splitting the broth in half each time). Puree until almost smooth. Pour the puree into the pot with the spices and stir. Heat through and serve.

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